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12/6/2016 » 12/7/2016
Newcomers in Your School: Cultural Connections and Instructional Strategies

12/8/2016 » 12/9/2016
Promoting Cultural Proficiency to Boost Outcomes for All Students

12/15/2016
CFP in Community-Based Learning and Second Language Instruction

CFP: Ten Years after the 2007 MLA Report Part II: Curricular Integration in Language Programs
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Has the curricular landscape evolved since 2007? Has the language major been re-envisioned to develop students’ translingual and transcultural competence?

3/15/2016
When: Tuesday, March 15, 2016
Where: MLA Conference
Austin, Texas 
United States
Contact: Johanna Watzinger-Tharp

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Ten Years after the 2007 MLA Report Part II: Curricular Integration in Language Programs

 

In 2007, the MLA published  “Foreign Languages and Higher Education:  New Structures for a Changed World.”  Motivated in part by the post-9/11 “language deficit” crisis faced by the United States, the report sought to contextualize the academic structure in which foreign language and cultural studies are undertaken in this country, as well as the availability of a professoriate capable of meeting the instructional needs of a globalized society. 

 

In the report, the relationship between language and culture is discussed in terms of curricular disassociation.  The authors suggest that foreign language departments and programs often separate the language and literature parts of the curriculum, creating governance and instructional divisions between the two. The report calls on foreign language departments and programs to reexamine the intersection between language, literature, and culture and to promote more integrated, interdisciplinary programs and curricula.

 

Detailed in the report are recommendations for integrated curricula that develop students’ translingual and transcultural competence, offer multiple paths to the major, and “situate language study in cultural, historical, geographic, and cross-cultural frames within the context of humanistic learning” (p. 4). This session invites presentations that detail how—or if—today’s foreign language departments and programs have responded to these recommendations and to the report’s call to transform the traditional two-tiered system.

 

Please send abstracts (maximum 200 words) to Johanna Watzinger-Tharp (j.tharp@utah.edu) by March 15, 2016.

 

 

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